Appendix A: Knowledge Check Questions and Answers

Note: The same questions are used in the Knowledge Check at both the beginning and end of each section.

Section 1: Introduction to Indigenous Peoples

Questions

  1. How many First Nations are there in Canada?
    1. Fewer than 100
    2. More than 100 but fewer than 500
    3. More than 500
  2. The terms First Nations and Indigenous Peoples have the same meaning.
    1. True
    2. False
  3. The three First Nations in Vancouver are the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh.
    1. True
    2. False
  4. To be recognized as a Métis citizen in BC, one must:
    1. Self-identify as Métis
    2. Have a direct ancestral connection to the historic Métis community
    3. Be accepted by a contemporary Métis community
    4. All of the above

Answers

  1. How many First Nations are there in Canada?
    1. Fewer than 100 – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn how many different First Nations there are in Canada today in this section.
    2. More than 100 but fewer than 500 – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn how many different First Nations there are in Canada today in this section.
    3. More than 500 – That’s right! The exact number can vary, but there are around 630 First Nations in Canada.
  2. The terms First Nations and Indigenous Peoples have the same meaning.
    1. True – Sorry, that’s not right. You’ll learn the difference between these terms in this section.
    2. False – That’s right! First Nations are one of the three groups of Indigenous Peoples in Canada, but not all Indigenous people are First Nations.
  3. The three First Nations in Vancouver are the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh.
    1. True – That’s right! The three First Nations in Vancouver are Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh.
    2. False – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about the First Nations of Vancouver in this section.
  4. To be recognized as a Métis citizen in BC, one must:
    1. Self-identify as Métis – Sorry, you are partially right. You will learn more about Métis peoples in this section.
    2. Have a direct ancestral connection to the historic Métis community – Sorry, you are partially right. You will learn more about Métis peoples in this section.
    3. Be accepted by a contemporary Métis community – Sorry, you are partially right. You will learn more about Métis peoples in this section.
    4. All of the above – That’s right! All conditions must be met to be recognized as a Métis citizen in BC

Section 2: Colonization

Questions

  1. Who decides whether someone is “officially” a Status Indian?
    1. The federal government
    2. The Assembly of First Nations
    3. Anyone can decide to be a Status Indian
  2. First Nations people still have laws and policies applied to them that are different from those applied to non-First Nations people.
    1. True
    2. False

Answers

  1. Who decides whether someone is “officially” a Status Indian?
    1. The federal government – That’s right! The federal government decides who is a “Status Indian.” There are no other ethnic groups in Canada for which the government decides membership. Further, there is only an Indian Act, and not an Italian or Irish Act.
    2. The Assembly of First Nations – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about the laws and policies that apply only to Indigenous Peoples in this section.
    3. Anyone can decide to be a Status Indian. – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about the laws and policies that apply only to Indigenous Peoples in this section.
  2. First Nations people still have laws and policies applied to them that are different from those applied to non-First Nations people. (True/False)
    1. True – That’s right! The Indian Act still exists and status Indians are still governed by it. There are many areas where Aboriginal people are treated differently with different laws and policies.
    2. False – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn more about status in this section.

 Section 3: Decolonization

Questions

  1. __________ is when someone takes an image, symbol, idea, song, dance, and so on from a group of people that they are not part of and uses it or claims it as their own or to advance themselves or their product. It is done without permission from or respect for the group.
    1. Microagression
    2. Cultural appropriation
    3. Stereotyping
  2. Which of the following statements about Aboriginal rights is true?
    1. Aboriginal rights are rights that Indigenous people have by virtue of the fact that they are Indigenous.
    2. They are rights that have been protected in the Constitution Act, 1982.
    3. The Canadian courts continue to define the extent of these rights.
    4. Indigenous people view Aboriginal rights as expansive and inclusive of both their traditional and contemporary ways of knowing and being.
    5. All of these are true
  3. What was established on June 2, 2008, and completed in December 2015, with the overarching goal of documenting and acknowledging the experiences of residential school survivors while working toward reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people?
    1. The Indian Act
    2. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission
    3. The Canada 150+ Commission
  4. ________________ is a process by which Indigenous Peoples are reclaiming their identities, land, and ways of being and knowing.
    1. Decolonization
    2. Reconciliation
    3. The treaty process

Answers

  1. ___________  is when someone takes an image, symbol, idea, song, dance, and so on from a group of people that they are not part of, and uses it or claims it as their own or to advance themselves or their product. It is done without permission from or respect for the group.
    1. Microagression – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about cultural appropriation in this section.
    2. Cultural appropriation – That’s right! Cultural appropriation is when someone takes an image, symbol, idea, song, dance, and so on from a group of people that they are not part of, and uses it or claims it as their own or to advance themselves or their product. It is done without permission from or respect for the group.
    3. Stereotyping – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about cultural appropriation in this section.
  2. Which of the following statements about Aboriginal rights is true?
    1. Aboriginal rights are rights that Indigenous people have by virtue of the fact that they are Indigenous. – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about Aboriginal rights in this section.
    2. They are rights that have been protected in the Constitution Act, 1982. – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about Aboriginal rights in this section.
    3. The Canadian courts continue to define the extent of these rights. – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about Aboriginal rights in this section.
    4. Indigenous people view Aboriginal rights as expansive and inclusive of both their traditional and contemporary ways of knowing and being. – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about Aboriginal rights in this section.
    5. All of these are true – That’s right! All of these are true.
  3. What was established on June 2, 2008, and completed in December 2015, with the overarching goal of documenting and acknowledging the experiences of residential school survivors while working toward reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people?
    1. The Indian Act – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in this section.
    2. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission – That’s right! The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada was established on June 2, 2008, and was completed in December 2015. One of the final documents to come from the TRC is the 94 “Calls to Action” that were released June 2015 with the goal of redressing “the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation. There is much more to the TRC and the legacy of residential schools, so we encourage you to learn more by doing your own research online.
    3. The Canada 150+ Commission – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in this section.
  4. ________________ is a process by which Indigenous Peoples are reclaiming their identities, land, and ways of being and knowing.
    1. Decolonization – That’s right! Decolonization is the “undoing” of all that colonization did to Indigenous Peoples. It is the changing of laws and policies that have been used to oppress and control Indigenous Peoples. It is the court cases and land claims settlements that have been fought for to ensure that Indigenous Peoples are benefiting from the land and have a future of self-government and self-determination. It is the righting of the wrongs of the past and changing the socio-economic indicators so that Indigenous Peoples are at or are moving toward the positive end.
    2. Reconciliation – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about decolonization in this section.
    3. The treaty process – Sorry, that’s not right. You will learn about decolonization in this section.

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