1st Canadian Edition Changes

Significant changes to the text are listed below. However, there may be numerous smaller changes between the original textbook and this 1st Canadian edition that are not significant enough to warrant inclusion on this list, i.e., changing a measurement from imperial to metric.

Chapter 1

Figures

  • Figure 1.1 changed
  • Added new figure 1.2
  • Added figures 1.5, 1.8, 1.9, 1.10, 1.11, 1.15

Introduction to Sociology

  • Added information about Vancouver hockey riots

What is Sociology?

  • Enhanced definition of Sociology with Dorothy Smith reference

Society and Culture

  • Enhanced and expanded  with micro- and macro- definitions

Sociological Imagination

  • Enhanced and expanded section on to include reference to C. Wright Mills, obesity rates in Canada.

Studying Patterns

  • Added information about reification
  • Removed information about U.S. housing crisis and Food Stamp Use in the U.S.
  • Added in reference to CBC program The Current and information about aboriginal incarceration rates  in Canada
  • Removed title Studying Part and Whole and merged with Studying Patterns section
  • Removed reference to the practice of religion
  • Removed section on Individual- Society Connections

History of Sociology

  • Enhanced section on Greek philosophy
  • Enhanced section on Eastern philosophy to expand section on Khaldun
  • Enhanced section on 19th century sociology to include contributions to discipline by Mac Weber and feminist contributions by Mary Wollstone.
  • Enhanced and expanded Comte section
  • Renamed, expanded and enhanced section on Karl Marx
  • Broke apart the Creating a Discipline section and added separate and expanded biographical sections for Harriet Martineau, Emile Durkheim, Max Webber, and Georg Simmel
  • Expanded Working Moms section and replaced American references with Canadian

Theoretical Perspectives

  • Rewrote and expanded the section to include Positivism and Quantitative Sociology
  • Expanded Structural Functionalism and criticism of sections
  • Added Interpretative Sociology, Historical Materialism, Feminism & criticisms of each
  • Added Farming & Locavores case study
  • Removed Conflict Theory

Why Study Sociology?

  • Replaced Elizabeth Eckford introductory example with Canadian health care system example.
  • Rewrote and expanded introduction to include reference to feminist movement and aboriginal perspectives.
  • Expanded the “Please Friend Me” to include data on smartphone use

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 2

Figures

  • Replaced figure 2.3 with Canadian census form
  • Removed Figure 2.4 – Malaria pill study
  • Replaced figure 2.5
  • Added figure 2.6

Introduction to Sociological Research

  • Updated cultural references in introduction
  • Replaced American references in the Survey’s section with Canadian

Experiments

  • Added Canadian case study:  Mincome
  • Replaced Parrotheads case study with “When sharing is not a good idea” Vancouver example

Feminist Perspective

  • Added new section on The Feminist Perspective: Institutional Ethnography

Ethical Concerns

  • Replaced American example with Canadian content on CSA, NSERC and other Canadian research bodies

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 3

Figures

  • Figure 3.2 updated caption
  • Added new figure 3.3: Ruth Benedict
  • Replaced figure 3.6 with new figure 3.7
  • Added figure 3.13 Women in armed forces

Introduction

  • Updated to include Canadian examples

What is Culture?

  • Updated to include Canadian examples

Ethnocentrism and Cultural Relativism

  • Updated to include aboriginal references to potlatch and West Coast First Nations customs
  • Added reference to Canadian anthropologist Ken Barger and work with Inuit cultures
  • Added reference to cultural anthropologist Ruth Benedict
  • Expanded to include feminist perspective

Values and Beliefs

  • Added paragraph on comparative differences between Canadian and US cultures

Norms

  • Changed US references to North America or Canada

Is Canada Bilingual

  • Rewritten to reflect Canadian perspective on bilingualism

High Culture and Popular Culture

  • Added paragraph on post-modern culture

Theoretical Perspectives on Culture

  • Expanded Functionalist perspective to include hockey references
  • Removed Conflict theorists
  • Added paragraph on critical sociologists
  • Added feminist and First nations content on voting in Canada
  • Added  Canadian cultural perspective with regard to treatment of Asian populations after World War 2
  • Added paragraph on critique of ideology and liberalism

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 4

Figures

  • Added Figure 4.4 Tapestry from 1070
  • Removed original figure 4.4 (Rockefeller) and replaced with new figure 4.5 (George Stephen)
  • Removed original figure 4.5 (Warren Buffet) and replaced with new figure 4.6 (Eaton company)
  • Removed original image figure 4.8 (automotive worker)
  • Added new figure 4.10 (Charlie Chaplin)
  • Added figure 4.12 Venus of Willendorf

Agriculture

  • Last paragraph rewritten

Industrial Society

  • Paragraph 3 was expanded
  • Paragraph 5 was changed to include Canadian references and historical figures

Postindustrial Society

  • Paragraph 2 was rewritten

Karl Marx

  • Section title changed from Karl Marx and Conflict Theory to Karl Marx and Critical Sociology
  • Expanded and section rewritten

Max Weber

  • Section titled changed from Max Weber and Symbolic Interactionism to Max Weber and Rationalization
  • Section rewritten and expanded

The Protestant Work Ethic

  • Paragraph added and sections reworked

Her-story: History of Gender Inequality

  • Substantial new section added

4.3 Social Construction of Reality

  • Last paragraph on symbolic interactionists removed

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 5

Figures

  • Replaced figure 5.8 Prince William

Psychological Perspectives on Self Development

  • Second paragraph on Freud rewritten and expanded
  • Paragraph on Erik Erickson expanded

Sociological Theories of Self Development

  • Expanded content on Cooley, Meaqd

Nature vs Nurture

  • Added paragraph on identical twins
  • Expanded section

Family

  • Expanded to include Quebec and Canadian parental leave information

School

  • Expanded to add Canadian context

Religion

  • Paragraph modified to include Canadian references

Government

  • Removed American reference to register with Selective Service System

The Long Road to Adulthood for Millennials

  • Expanded and rewrote for Canadian context

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 6

Figures

  • Replaced figure 6.1
  • Added figure 6.2
  • Original figure 6.3 (American football team) replaced with new figure 6.4 (Canadian hockey team)
  • Changed caption of figure 6.5 (originally figure 6.4)
  • Removed figure 6.6
  • Added figure 6.8 and figure 6.9
  • Figure 6.10(a) changed (original was figure 6.8(a))

Introduction to Groups and Organizations

  • Expanded to include local references for Occupy movement, more on the functionalist perspective,  the critical perspective and added the feminist perspective on the Occupy movement
  • Added paragraph on Slavoj Zizek

6.1. Types of Groups

  • Expanded introduction to topic

Types of Groups

  • Added paragraph on Peter Marsden and core discussion groups.

Bullying and Cyberbullying: How Technology Has Changed the Game

  • Changed to include local reference case and Canadian statistics

6.2. Groups and Networks

  • Section title changed to Groups and Networks from Group Size and Structure
  • Section expanded to include social networks and network analysis

Women Leaders and the Glass Ceiling

  • Section title changed to Women Leaders and the Glass Ceiling from Women Leaders and the Hillary Clinton Sarah Palin Phenomenon
  • Changed case study from US politics (Hillary Clinton/Sarah Palin) to Canadian politics (Elizabeth May)
  • Added concept of glass celining

Conformity

  • Expanded to include Stanley Milgram

Formal Organizations

  • Topic introduction expanded
  • Paragraph on positive aspects of bureaucracies rewritten

The McDonaldization of Society

  • Section expanded

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 7

Figures

  • Changed figure 7.1, 7.10, 7.11
  • Added a new figure 7.2 – Lizzy Borden. Old figure 7.2 now becomes figure 7.3
  • Added figure 7.5, 7.6, 7.12, 7.13
  • Figure 7.8 removed

Introduction

  • Complete rewrite with new content

7.1 Deviance and Control

  • Major expansion and revision of this section
  • New definitions added (folkways, mores, laws, crime, etc.)
  • Why I drive a Hearse?: Expanded to include Neil Young reference
  • Social Control: Major expansion of this section to include a new sub-section on Social Control as Government and Discipline & removed table 7.1

7.2 Theoretical Perspectives on Deviance

  • Strain Theory and Social Disorganization Theory sections switched
  • Strain Theory: Expanded, references changed to reflect Canadian culture more (reference to the “American Dream” changed to “financial success”, reference to “terrorists and freedom fighters” changed to “rebels”)
  • Social Disorganization Theory: Major expansion
  • Critical Sociology: New section added on Critical Sociology
  • Crime and Social Class: Expanded and updated with Canadian information
  • Feminist Contributions: New section added on Feminist contributions
  • Conflict Theory, Karl Marx and C. Wright Mills: Sections removed
  • Travis Hirschi: Control Theory section: removed, integrated into Social Disorganization Theory section
  • Symbolic Interactionism: Section expanded to include new subsection on Deviance as Learned Behaviour
  • Labelling Theory: Section expanded and new content added
  • Right to Vote Case Study: Sections removed
  • Edwin Sutherland: Differential Association: Section removed

7.3 Crime and the Law

  • What is Crime?: Introduction expanded and rewritten, Colton Harris-Moore example removed & replaced with Canadian example
  • Types of crimes: Minor revisions
  • Hate Crimes Case Study: Rewritten from Canadian perspective
  • Crime Statistics: Rewritten with Canadian data and perspectives, removed United States Criminal Justice System section and Courts section
  • Corrections: Expanded and rewrote section to reflect Canadian system.

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 8

Figures

  • Added figure 8.5

Introduction

  • Introduction: Minor rewrite to add Canadian content

8.1 Technology Today

  • Technology Inequality: minor revisions, removed references to black Americans study
  • Planned Obsolescence: minor revisions, added paragraph to include embodied energy

8.2 Media and Technology in Society

  • Intro paragraph: minor revisions
  • Categorizing Technology: Added paragraph on Saskatchewan Monsanto court case
  • Print Newspaper: minor revisions to include Canadian examples
  • Television and Radio: major revisions to include Canadian examples
  • Film: added a large section on the Canadian film industry
  • New Media: added paragraph on Google and Facebook
  • Violence in Media and Video Games: Does It Matter?: added paragraph on the Canadian rating system for video games
  • Product Advertising: Major revisions, paragraphs added on Google and Canadian market research
  • Homogenization and Fragmentation: section removed

8.3 Global Implications

  • Media Globalization section: Replaced section on U.S. media corporations with new references to Canadian media corporations
  • China and the Internet section: Minor revisions to include Canadian examples

8.4 Theoretical Perspectives on Media and Technology

  • Functionalism section: Renamed to Structural Functionalism
  • Commercial Function section: Removed references to U.S. TV channels
  • Entertainment Function section: revised to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Conflict Perspective section: Renamed to Critical Sociology; references to the conflict perspective replaced with references to critical sociology
  • Control of Media and Technology: revised to reflect the Canadian government
  • Social Networking and Social Construction section: concluding section added on the tension between the liberty and control of technology

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 9

Figures

  • Added Figure 9.11

Introduction

  • Introduction: Completely rewritten to include example on Ted Rogers

9.1 What is Social Stratification?

  • Introduction: Major revisions and expansion to reflect Canadian content
  • The Caste System: Major revisions and expansions to include examples of the caste system from Europe, Japan, and India
  • The Class System: Major revisions and expansion to this section
  • Meritocracy, Status Consistency sections removed

9.2 Social Stratification and Mobility in the United States

  • Title changed to “Social Stratification and Mobility in the United States”
  • Introduction: Introductory paragraph revised to reflect earlier content
  • Standard of Living: major revisions to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Social Classes in the United States: heading changed to refer to Canada, references of the U.S. changed to references of Canada, major expansion and revision to reflect Canadian content and culture
  • Upper Class: renamed “The Owning Class,” references of the upper class changes to references of the owning class, content revised to reflect Canadian examples
  • The Lower Class: remaned “The Traditional Working Class,” major revisions to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Social Mobility: major revisions and expansion to reflect Canadian statistics, as well as comparisons between Canada’s and the United States’ degrees of social mobility

9.4 Theoretical Perspectives on Social Stratification

  • Conflict Theory: Major revision and expansion to include Canadian examples, as well as earlier content, and references to critical sociology instead of conflict theory
  • Symbolic Interactionism: Major revisions and expansion on social standing and cultural capital

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 10

Figures

  • Changed Figure 10.2

10.1 Global Stratification and Classification

  • Introduction: Minor revisions to include section on cultural values
  • Cold War Terminology: Major revisions and expansion to include a more in-depth analysis of global inequality as economic development
  • Immanuel Wallerstein: World Systems Approach: minor resources to reflect Canadian content
  • High-Income Nations: revised to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Capital Flight, Outsourcing, and Jobs in America: renamed to “Capital Flight, Outsourcing, and Jobs in Canada” and major revisions to reflect Canadian events

10.2 Global Wealth and Poverty

  • Sweatshops and Student Protests: Who’s Making Your Team Spirit?: Renamed to the “The True Cost of a T-Shirt,” major revisions and expansion to reflect Canadian industries
  • Introduction: Introductory paragraph revised to reflect earlier content

10.3 Theoretical Perspectives on Global Stratification

  • Dependency Theory: Expanded to include section on metropolis-hinterland relationships
  • Introduction: Introductory paragraph revised to reflect earlier content
  • Added section on Globalization Theory
  • Factory Girls: Expanded to include a longer conclusion

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 11

Figures

  • Changed Figure 11.1, 11.4, 11.7
  • Added Figure 11.2, 11.3, 11.5, 11.10, 11.11, 11.12, 11.13, 11.14, 11.15
  • In “Race and Ethnicity in the United States,” removed Figure 2, Figure 3, Figure 4

Introduction

  • Major changes and revisions to reflect Canadian statistics and references to Canadian cities
  • Includes a new section on large-scale Canadian immigration

11.1 Racial, Ethnic, and Minority Groups

  • What Is Race?: minor revisions to reference Afro-Caribbean Canadians rather than African Americans
  • What Are Minority Groups?: minor revisions made to reflect Canadian immigration history
  • Multiple Identities: major revisions, new section added on Canada’s Métis people

11.2 Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination

  • Discrimination: major revisions to include Canadian examples of discrimination
  • The Confederate Flag vs. the First Amendment: Entire section changed to a section on Institutional Racism in Canada

11.3 Theories of Race and Ethnicity

  • Functionalism: paragraph added on the positive functions of ethnic and racial membership
  • Conflict Theory: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, examples changed to reflect Canadian history
  • Interactionism: section renamed “Symbolic Interactionism”
  • Culture of Prejudice: section integrated into the prior section on Symbolic Interactionism

11.4 Intergroup Relationships

  • Section title renamed “Intergroup Relations and the Management of Diversity”
  • Introduction: new section added on the history of strategies for diversity management
  • Expulsion: Major revision and expansion to reflect Canadian history
  • Segregation: Major revision and expansion to reflect Canadian history
  • Pluralism: section removed
  • Assimilation: Major revision and expansion to reflect Canadian history
  • Amalgamation: section removed
  • Multiculturalism, Hybridity: sections added

11.5 Race and Ethnicity in the United States

  • Section title renamed “Race and Ethnicity in Canada”
  • Native Americans: section renamed “Aboriginal Canadians” and statistics changed to Canadian statistics
  • History of Intergroup Relations: major revision and expansion to reflect the Canadian history of aboriginal relations with Europeans
  • Current Status: major revision and expansion to reflect the Canadian history of aboriginal people in Canada
  • African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Arab Americans, White Ethnic Americans: section titles changed to “The Québécois”, “Black Canadians”, and “Asian Canadians”, all section and subsection content changed accordingly to reflect the histories of various peoples in Canada

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 12

Figures

  • Added Figure 12.3
  • In “Sex and Sexuality,” removed Figure 2

Introduction

  • Major changes and revisions to reflect Canadian statistics and references to Canadian cities
  • Includes a new section on large-scale Canadian immigration

12.1 The Difference Between Sex and Gender

  • The Legalese of Sex and Gender: new paragraphs added with Canadian examples of legal deliberations on the meanings of sex and gender
  • Sexual Orientation: minor revisions to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Gender Identity: minor revisions to reflect Canadian statistics and organizations

12.2 Gender

  • Social Stratification and Inequality: minor revisions to reflect Canadian statistics and dates
  • Structural Functionalism: added paragraph on the North American kinship system
  • Conflict Theory: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology
  • Feminist Theory: added section on bifurcated consciousness

12.3 Sex and Sexuality

  • Sexuality in the United States: section renamed “Sexuality in Canada,” minor revisions to reflect Canadian statistics, section on youth values about sex and sexuality removed
  • Sex Education: section removed
  • Conflict Theory: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, major revisions and paragraphs added on the dominant gender schema
  • Symbolic Interactionism: minor revisions, section on the coming-out process added

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 13

Figures

  • Added Figure 13.4
  • Changed Figure 13.3, 13.5, 13.6, 13.7, 13.17
  • In “Challenges Facing the Elderly,” removed Figure 3

13.1 Who Are the Elderly? Aging in Society

  • Studying Aging Populations: major revisions and paragraphs added to reflect Canadian statistics such as Canada’s growing population and changing age distribution of aboriginal peoples
  • Phases of Aging: The Young-Old, Middle-Old, and Old-Old: paragraph added on gender imbalance with respect to age in Canada
  • The Graying of the United States: changed to “The Greying of Canada,” major revisions to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Baby Boomers: major revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Aging Around the World: example added on Chinese Canadians and filial responsibility

13.2 The Process of Aging

  • Introduction: section on self-definition added
  • Biological Changes: minor revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Social and Psychological Changes: revisions made to reflect Canadian history on retirement
  • Aging “Out:” LGBT Seniors: section on policy recommendations removed
  • Death and Dying: paragraphs added on physician-assisted suicide in Canada

13.3 Challenges Facing the Elderly

  • Poverty: section removed
  • Mistreatment and Abuse: minor revisions to reflect Canadian statistics
  • World War II Veterans: section removed

13.4 Theoretical Perspectives on Aging

  • Introduction: section on structural functionalism added
  • The Graying of American Prisons: renamed “The Greying of North American Prisons,” major revisions made to reflect Canadian prison statistics
  • Conflict Perspective: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, revisions made to reflect Canadian statics and to expand on concepts, section on exchange theory incorporated into the next section on Symbolic Interactionism
  • Symbolic Interactionism: added section on exchange theory

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 14

Figures

  • Changed Figure 14.5, 14.9; Table 14.2, 14.3

Introduction

  • Minor revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics

14.1 What is Marriage? What Is a Family?

  • Introduction: section added on the functionalist perspective
  • Challenges Families Face: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Stages of Family Life: added section on liquid modernity

14.2 Variations in Family Life

  • Introduction: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Single Parents: revisions and expansions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Cohabitation: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Same-Sex Couples: revisions and expansions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Staying Single: revisions and expansions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Deceptive Divorce Rates: major revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics, added paragraph on calculating divorce rates based on the total divorce rate
  • Conflict Theory: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, major revisions and expansion made to reflect Canadian studies, included quote by Betty Friedan
  • Symbolic Interactionism: paragraph added on the norms surrounding the definition of a “normal” family

14.3 Challenges Families Face

  • Divorce and Remarriage: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics, added quote by Samuel Johnson
  • Children of Divorce and Remarriage: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics, study sources changed
  • Domestic Violence: revisions and additions made on Canadian violent crime statistics, American IPV statistics removed
  • Child Abuse: renamed “Child Abuse and Corporal Punishment,” major revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 15

Figures

  • In “World Religions,” removed Figure 1

15.1 The Sociological Approach to Religion

  • The History of Religion as a Sociological Concept: paragraphs added on faith as a “social cement” and Protestantism supporting the pursuit of material gain
  • The Protestant Work Ethic in the Information Age: section added on Catholic detective novels, section on the “McDonaldization of the United States” removed
  • Conflict Theory: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, paragraphs on the sociological effects of religion and evangelicals, section added on the scrutiny of feminist scholars
  • Rational Choice Theory: Can Economic Theory be Applied to Religion?: section removed

15.2 World Religions

  • Changed section name to “Types of Religious Organizations”
  • Introduction: Introductory paragraph added
  • The World’s Religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Islam, Christianity): sections removed

15.3 Religion in the United States

  • Changed section name to “Religion and Social Change”
  • Introduction: Introductory paragraph added
  • Religion and Social Change: revisions made to reflect Canada’s history with religion as social change
  • Liberation Theology, Megachurches: sections removed
  • Secularization: major revisions and expansion to reflect Canadian statistics and stance on religion, removal of “Thank God for that Touchdown: Separation of Church and State” section

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 16

Figures

  • Changed Figure 16.1; Table 16.1
  • In “Issues in Education,” removed Figure 1

Introduction

  • Major revisions and paragraph added on the effect of the educational system on socialization

16.1 Education Around the World

  • Introduction: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Formal and Informal Education: minor revisions made to reflect Canadian history
  • Access to Education: major revisions made to include Canadian examples of educational policy, quote by Joseph Cornelius Waddy removed

16.2 Theoretical Perspectives on Education

  • Introduction: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Formal and Informal Education: minor revisions made to reflect Canadian history
  • Latent Functions: revisions made to reflect Canadian patriotism practices
  • Conflict Theory: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics and the studies of Pierre Bourdieu
  • Feminist Theory: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics and Canadian women

16.3 Issues in Education

  • Entire section removed

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 17

Figures

  • Changed Figure 17.1, 17.2, 17.3, 17.11, 17.19
  • Added Figure 17.5, 17.6, 17.7, 17.8, 17.9, 17.10, 17.12, 17.13, 17.14, 17.15, 17.16, 17.17, 17.18, 17.20, 17.21
  • In “Forms of Government,” removed Figure 2, Figure 3, Figure 4, Figure 5
  • In “Politics in the United States,” removed all figures
  • In “Introduction to Sociology,” removed Figure 2, Figure 3

Introduction

  • Rewrote the section to examine revolutions instead of the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton

17.1 Power and Authority

  • Introduction: removed paragraph on royalty, added paragraphs on the power relationships between rulers and ruled
  • What Is Power?: added paragraph on power relationships between ruler and ruled, expanded on Max Weber’s definitions of power, removed paragraph on modern technology and nonviolent reform, added paragraphs on distinction between domination and power
  • Politics and the State: added section
  • Traditional Authority, Charismatic Authority, Rational-Legal Authority: sections integrated into section on “Types of Authority,” major revisions to include different examples of leaders, including Jack Layton

17.2 Forms of Government

  • Section changed to “Democratic Will Formation”
  • Introduction: major expansion to include more information on anarchy, direct democracy and democratic will formation
  • Political Demand and Political Supply: section added
  • Monarchy, Oligarchy, Dictatorship, Democracy: sections removed

17.3 Politics in the United States

  • Replaced entirely with section called “The De-Centring of the State: Terrorism, War, Empire, and Political Exceptionalism”

17.4 Theoretical Perspectives on Government and Power

  • Introduction: section completely rewritten to refer back to the earlier section on anarchy in 17.2
  • Functionalism: section completely rewritten and expanded to include Talcott Parsons’ statement of structural functionalism
  • Conflict Theory: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, section completely rewritten and expanded to include three types of critical sociology, including Marxism, feminism, and Michel Foucault’s work
  • Symbolic Interactionism: paragraphs on symbolic interactionists removed, sections added on the symbolic nature of political emblems
  • Making Connections: Social Policy and Debate: section added

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 18

Figures

  • Changed Figure 18.5, 18.11, 18.12, 18.15
  • Added Figure 18.13, 18.16
  • In “Globalization and the Economy,” removed all Figures

18.1 Economic Systems

  • Economics of Agricultural, Industrial, and Postindustrial Societies: added section on usufruct
  • The Lady Who Lives Without Money: added paragraph on Vancouver Island’s L.E.T.S.
  • Postindustrial Societies and the Information Age: Added section on modernization theory
  • Capitalism: includes concluding section which sums up its unique set of features
  • Capitalism in Practice: revisions made to include Canadian examples
  • Socialism: revisions made to include examples of communist systems, and state intervention in Canada’s economy
  • Socialism in Practice: section on Marx’s theories on socialism expanded
  • Convergence Theory: renamed “Modernization Theory and Convergence Theory,” added section on modernization theory and concluding paragraph on the criticism surrounding modernization theory and convergence theory
  • Conflict Perspective: section title and references of conflict theory changed to Critical Sociology, revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics

18.2 Globalization and the Economy

  • Entire section removed

18.3 Work in the United States

  • Section renamed to “Work in Canada”
  • Introduction: references to the American Dream removed
  • Polarization in the Workforce: revised to include references to the dual-labour market structure instead of the class system, Canadian statistics, and the Canadian job market; removed paragraph on rising education levels in the United States
  • Women in the Workforce: completely rewritten to reflect women in the Canadian workforce
  • Immigration and the Workforce: completely rewritten to reflect immigration in the Canadian workforce
  • Poverty in the United States: section renamed “Poverty in Canada,” revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics, added a concluding paragraph concerning the shift to neoliberal economic policies

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 19

Figures

  • Added Figure 19.5
  • In “Comparative Health and Medicine,” all Figures removed

Introduction

  • Minor revisions made to reference an outbreak of pertussis in Canada instead of California, and to tie health to broader social issues

19.3 Health in the United States

  • Section renamed “Health in Canada”
  • Introduction: revisions to reference health in Canada and the Canadian health care system
  • Health by Race and Ethnicity: rewritten to reference Canadian health disparities and health issues by race and ethnicity
  • Health by Socioeconomic Status: first paragraph rewritten and expanded to reference Canadian health disparities and health issues by socioeconomic status
  • Health by Gender: first paragraph rewritten to reference Canadian statistics on gender and health
  • Mental Health: major revisions to reflect percentages of mental disorders in Canada
  • Disability: major revisions to reflect percentages of disabilities in Canada, paragraph on Canadian public policy on disability added

19.4 Comparative Health and Medicine

  • Entire section removed

19.5 Theoretical Perspectives on Health and Medicine

  • Conflict Perspective: section title and references of conflict perspective changed to Critical Sociology, revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics, section on corporate influence on the health care system expanded, section on homosexual couples removed, paragraphs on biopolitics added
  • Symbolic Interactionism: minor section on excessive drinking as a “disease of the will” added

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 20

Figures

  • Added Figure 20.1, 20.9, 20.11
  • In Introduction, Figure 2 removed
  • In “Urbanization,” Figure 3 and Figure 6 removed
  • Changed Figure 20.3, 20.5, 20.7, 20.8; Table 20.1

Introduction

  • Section completely rewritten to talk about the Alberta Tar Sands instead of Centralia, Pennsylvania
  • Section after Figure 2 (which is removed in the Canadian version) now has a new subheading which reads “How does sociological research help to understand and respond to these issues?”

20.1 Demography and Population

  • Population Growth: Table 20.1 expanded to reflect Canadian statistics, following paragraph expanded to make mention of Canadian statistics

20.2 Urbanization

  • The Growth of Cities: concluding sentence on economic recession removed
  • Urbanization in the United States: section renamed to “Urbanization in Canada,” rewritten to reflect Canadian statistics, removed section on Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle”
  • A Postmillenial Jungle: A Story of Coming of Age in the Bronx: section removed
  • Paragraphs on the corporate city and postmodern city added
  • Suburbs and Exurbs: section on Canadian cities and elite residential presence added, paragraph on the “white flight” trend in the United States removed
  • Urbanization around the World: major revisions and expansion to refer to increasing population statistics in multiple cities, added paragraphs on slum cities and the global city
  • Theoretical Perspectives on Urbanization: paragraph on the conflict perspective edited to refer to the critical perspective, large section on the dynamics of city development added
  • The Migration of Mothers: section removed

20.3 The Environment and Society

  • Figure 1: caption changed
  • Tragedy of the Commons: section on Earth’s carrying capacity added
  • Garbage: revisions made to reflect Canadian statistics
  • Air: major expansion to detail the types of air pollution, as well as reflect Canadian statistics
  • Toxic and Radioactive Waste: first paragraph expanded to provide more detail on nuclear meltdowns, including the meltdowns in Fukushima, Japan
  • Would You Buy an Environment Cause From This Woman?: final paragraph expanded to refer to the UN scientists on climate change that are often unheard
  • Environmental Racism, American Indian Tribes and Environmental Racism: sections removed

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content

Chapter 21

Figures

  • Changed Figure 21.5, 21.6, 21.10

Introduction

  • Added section on the 19th century union movement

21.1 Collective Behaviour

  • Types of Collective Behaviour: minor revisions to reflect Canadian crowds and collective groups
  • Theoretical Perspectives on Collective Behaviour: section expanded to include Le Bon’s early views on crowds and riots
  • Table 21.1: section on collective verbalization changed to refer to ‘O Canada’ instead of the Pledge of Allegiance

21.2 Levels of Social Movements

  • Levels of Social Movements: Section rewritten
  • Local: section rewritten to include examples about Winnipeg Boldness Project instead of AREA Chicago
  • State: section renamed to “Regional,” section rewritten and expanded to include examples from Canadian extreme right social movements
  • National: section rewritten to include examples from Idle No More instead of gay marriage
  • Types of Social Movements: examples changed to examples more familiar to Canadians
  • Theoretical Perspectives on Social Movements: section expanded to include more detail on the three theories
  • Resource Mobilization Theory: revisions made to refer to Canadian political parties
  • Framing/Frame Analysis: revisions and expansions to include Canadian examples, section added on Carroll and Ratner’s argument on using a social justice frame
  • New Social Movement Theory: section rewritten to include Melucci’s analysis of the lifeworld

Key Terms, Section Summary, Quiz, Further Research and References

  • Updated to reflect new chapter content