Glossary of Terms

Aakde’ewin: one of the seven grandmothers’ teachings (Kokum Dibaajimowinan), in Anishinaabemowin, means courage, the art of being brave, or being “strong-hearted,” not in the physical sense but in the sense of self-knowledge.

Chinook jargon: developed by Indigenous Peoples as an inclusive means of communicating across cultures, nations, and languages.

Dbadendiziwin: one of the seven grandmothers’ teachings (Kokum Dibaajimowinan), in Anishinaabemowin, means the art of humility, never looking upon yourself as better than anyone else, and looking after yourself.

Debwewin: one of the seven grandmothers’ teachings (Kokum Dibaajimowinan), in Anishinaabemowin, means truth, or “sound of the heart” in the sense of speaking from the heart.

Gwekwaadiziwin: one of the seven grandmothers’ teachings (Kokum Dibaajimowinan), in Anishinaabemowin, means living a straight or honest life.

ikta: “what” in Chinook jargon.

Indigenization: a relational and collaborative process that involves various levels of transformation, from inclusion and integration to infusion of Indigenous perspectives and approaches in education.

kahta: “how” in Chinook jargon.

Kokum Dibaajimowinan: in Anishinaabemowin, means the grandmothers’ teachings around courage, truth, respect, love, honesty, wisdom, and humility, common values typically reflected in Indigenous teachings.

Mnaadendiwin: one of the seven grandmothers’ teachings (Kokum Dibaajimowinan), in Anishinaabemowin, means respect, or deeply cherishing each other.

Nbwaakawin: one of the seven grandmothers’ teachings (Kokum Dibaajimowinan), in Anishinaabemowin, means putting others before yourself, and keeping ego in check.

Turtle Island: the name the Lenape, Iroquois, Anishnaabe, and other Woodland Nations gave to North America. The name comes from a story about Sky Woman. Many Indigenous people, Indigenous rights activists, and environmental activists now use the term for North America.

wake siah kopa: near, “not far there” in Chinook jargon.

yaa-yuk-miss: a Nuu-chah-nulth term that expresses both the love and pain involved in transformative experiences.

Zaagidewin: one of the seven grandmothers’ teachings (Kokum Dibaajimowinan), in Anishinaabemowin, means love, or unconditional love.

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Pulling Together: A Guide for Leaders and Administrators by Sybil Harrison, Janice Simcoe, Dawn Smith, and Jennifer Stein is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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