Section 4: Incorporating Diverse Sources of Indigenous Knowledge

Summary

Incorporating Indigenous resources appropriately is complex. When including a resource in your curriculum, there are many important factors to consider, and each decision is highly contextualized; it may depend on the relationship you have with the source of the resource, the way in which you are using the resource, and the context of the course. The authenticity of the resource may also be a complex consideration, taking into account both the identity of the creator and their relationship with the subject of their work.

This complexity is not a reason to exclude Indigenous content. Indigenous content has valuable lessons for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous learners, and it has been excluded for too long. While it may seem daunting, it is important to remember that relationships are the key to navigating these decisions. When you have strong relationships with Indigenous communities and experts, you can turn to this community for support when making decisions about resources.

Key learnings from the section

  • Indigenous knowledge is diverse. Consider including resources from First Nations, Urban Indigenous, Métis, and Inuit peoples.
  • Resources can come in many forms, including personal experience, oral communication, and other non-textual or non-verbal forms.
  • Cultural appropriation is a complex issue. To avoid cultural appropriation, ensure you have permission to include resources in a respectful way.
  • When selecting resources, consider whether they are authentic.
  • Look for opportunities to incorporate local knowledge and contribute to language revitalization.

License

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Summary by Asma-na-hi Antoine, Rachel Mason, Roberta Mason, Sophia Palahicky, and Carmen Rodriguez de France is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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